Wednesday, 16 October 2013

Received pronunciation


18 comments:

  1. Hermes- "air-mez"
    Lettera- "let-errah" (soften or 'roll' the 'r's. Basically, if you can mimic the purring of a cat without uttering the letter 'p', you're halfway there.)

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  2. I just saw the Facit part of your post, Rob. I'm thinking "Fah-cheet".

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  3. It's definitely "Olivet-ti," pronouncing both t's.
    A couple of years ago, Franceso, my friend from Umbria,confirmed that it's "LET-tera." Accent on first syllable, pronouncing both t's.

    Add this:
    Triumph- "tree-UMPH"
    Perfekt- "per-FEKT"

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  4. For me it was always

    Le-TEAR-uh (only pronouncing the second T of course, and the classic "uh" at the end)
    AIR-maze (I've said it like this for the longest time...it's supposed to be like the French but probably not)

    Hah.

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  5. Also...is that a "Shilling" symbol??

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    1. Nick, yes it is a shilling symbol. There's an Rs symbol which I think is for South African Rand. It would make sense in many countries in pre-independence African countries to have Rand, Shilling and £ sterling on a keyboard. Note that Sh was never used in the UK as a symbol for the pre-decimalisation pounds (L), shillings (s) and pence (d).

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    2. I wondered about that, since I was pretty sure they just used a plain s to represent shilling.

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    3. Then again... it might just be the key to use if you are typing in a library.

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    4. (L)(s)(d) you say... It must've been a habit tough to break with... ;)

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    5. :-) The thing is, how can you explain L = Livres lourdes and D = dinarii. And why S for dollars I wonder? We don't make life easy.

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    6. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    7. Deleted by mistake. I have always believed Rs to be rupees as I have it on a Remington 5 that travelled east. But having shillings and rand on the same machine makes sense.

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    8. Yes, the first time I saw it was on a Remington Noiseless Portable keyboard I bought several years ago. Because it was ex-colonial service in India, I'd assumed it was Rupees too. Maybe it doubles for Rand?

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  6. This is a great topic. We deal in text so much in the typosphere that pronunciation is left to the individual's predilections and conscience, in the absence of any further information.

    For whatever it's worth, I say "Hér-meez" (I know that's not the French pronunciation of Hermès, but we don't say "Paree" in English either), "Léttera," and "Fassit."

    I'll add that according to my dictionary, it's platten, not playten, as some suppose.

    Having Robert Messenger here may completely scramble my vowels, by the way. I may start talking like a bloke from En Zed!

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    1. If you have made it to honorary 'bloke' status, you are half Kiwi already :-)

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  7. Possible meaning of Sh, according to the Great Google: Kenyan shillings.

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  8. I never gave thought to the pronunciation of the brands or models until I started collecting typewriters. I still find myself Englishizing or Americanizing most names. Reason: just because I can. However to sound halfway intelligent or educated when speaking with those who know better I do try to use proper pronunciation. I think Hermes is the most varied or mis-pronounced of all.

    I like Richard's comment on listening to Robert. I grew up in Pennsylvania Dutch country and find I easily revert to my Dutch accent except if I am around a Scott or Englishman or German. Then I find I quickly pick up their accent. Now if I could only remember all the German I forgot.

    Then I have worked with people from all over the world and I found that when someone is difficult to understand (when they speak English) and I can pick up their accent, all sounds normal and any difficulty in understanding goes by the wayside.

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