Wednesday, 3 September 2014

Man of Letters


15 comments:

  1. Awesome work, Rob, very much appreciate the surgical work. I will definitely bookmark this.

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    1. Thanks Ton. The differences are legion and were a complete surprise. NOW I can see what the excitement is about a Lettera 22 and why some people prefer them. I'd say they are on a par with the 32 for use as a serious (or lighthearted) typing iron but you get more interesting metalwork with the 22.

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  2. Very helpful comparison.

    Ton recently showed me a top-condition 22 and I had to get another for my collection (I had let two of them go in the past), so one is on its way ...

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  3. I was also surprised when I got my 32 and comparing it with my 22. I'm one of the crowd that prefers the 22, but the 32 is better in one way in my experience—the carriage rails. The suspended tube carriage is prone to getting out of alignment so that when you slide the carriage across, you feel two little clunks as the pressure moves from one contact point to the other. I have owned two, and the first one had that problem bad enough I stopped using it and searched out a replacement.

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    1. Nick, a Studio 44 I picked up came with the same problem. The bobbin like rollers are mounted on eccentric screws which are tightened with a locknut. By slackening and then turning the screws it is fairly straightforward to get them all lined up and the carriage running straight. I think this is actually and advantage for the home mechanic rather than a handicap.

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    2. Thanks for that tip, I'll have to give the other one a look—I still have it and I may get some more use out of it yet.

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    3. I still have it out and un-masked so I'll see if it is a easy (well, relatively easy) as it was on the Studio 44 ...and the Lexikon 80 for that matter.

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  4. I have only met 3 Lettera 22's that I would have taken home, and none of them were for sale. The rest have struck me as having "dead-ish" typing action. I suspect my luck has been bad. ):

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    1. I think that's why a head to head comparison is probably unfair. Condition has so much to do with the way they feel. That's why I was lucky when Piotr offered to sell his to me because I knew it would be in good running order. All the same, some TLC on a scruffy example should result in a similarly light and lively typing action.

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  5. Thanks for the great comparison between the 2 models. I have yet to add either to my collection.

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    1. Keep an eye out Bill, they don't take up too much room.

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  6. Interesting to read this detailed comparison, since I have both and I prefer the L22 for its typing action and looks. The L32 is a pretty good runner-up though. ;)

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  7. Funny. I found the 22 and the 32 very similar in function, although the 22 struck me as a better built, earlier version of the machine. But I prefer my 32 to the 22 I got some time ago; the 22 needs to pay a visit to the local shop to fix an annoying tendency of the escapement to move the carriage two spaces instead of one when you type at some speed. When, and if I have that problem solved, the 22 might indeed be as fun to type on as the Lettera 32.

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    1. Miguel, that is probably a result of too much up-down movement in the carriage so it disengages momentarily from the escapement cog. Remove the covers and see if you can get to the three rollers along which the tubular rear carriage rail runs. Adjust them so they are are all JUST touching the tube at a low setting. A little play is better than if it binds.

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  8. Personally, I prefer the L22 over the32 any day. While I like my 22, I don't so much... Love it. They're great little typewriters, sure. But honestly, I just find other machines a more solid or fluid typer, so I tend to favor others.

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