Thursday, 8 August 2013

Studio 44 - unstuck




9 comments:

  1. Impressive job, Rob, congratulations! I'll keep this on file for future reference.

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  2. Congrats on the successful discovery of the problem, Bob. I can appreciate the twisting of the head and changing of lighting angle it takes to sleuth out a problem like that, having just worked out a ribbon advance problem with my Underwood Champion. Your Studio 44 produces very even impressions in perfect alignment. No wonder, given the tidy construction and the precision cast and machined parts. I'm looking forward to receipt of a Studio 45, an eBay purchase currently making a painfully slow trek of it from the east to the west over here in the states.

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    1. Thanks Tony, I had the fortune to be able to pick this one up personally. It had been stored in a damp shed for some time but now seems to be running on-song.

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  3. Nice work! Yet another excellent entry to the Typosphere's "repair tips" file (:

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  4. Congratulations on figuring out the problem with the "slider thingy." At first your seeming familiarity with what seemed like perfectly legitimate names of parts intimidated me, but your last sentence made me a lot more comfortable. :)

    Glad your skittles losses are becoming less embarrassing!

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    1. Sometimes you just have to make it up :-)

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  5. Rob, that slider thingy is called an Universal Bar and most typewriters have one. Good thinking holding the escapement back as this would have taken the pressure of the U-bar. This a good way to find out any sticking keys and other parts. In fact a good test for sticking type bars is to hold the space bar down and type, that way the bar falls up and down under its own steam ,so to speak. The most common part damaged on the Studio was the Line-space Lever which although nicely formed and an elegant solution to the problem of putting the top of the case back on sadly lots of people would forget to fold it properly and the lever would get forced downwards resulting in damage....

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  6. Congratulations on your repair.

    I too find the Studio 44 a beast to work on. Such weird design. I got mine working in short order over lunch one day last year. Then the drawstring I used came off the drum. So I used a lighter monofilament to replace the heavier monofilament I used at first. The machine worked fine for a while until it started skipping. There are a few other issues and I may repair it or I may scrap it as a machine for parts. There are plenty of them out there for a few dollars.

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  7. Another example where you manage to arrange an unlikely marriage of mechanical engineering and poetry

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